Time to Change

2013 Program Schedule


OTS 2013 Program

Jump to a Day/Section

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 Thursday, February 2013
Opening Session Sports Turf/ORFA Sessions
Sports Turf/ORFA Sessions Lawn Care
Lawn Care Golf
Golf Sod Growers
  General Sessions

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

W1  8:45 to 8:50 am  Welcoming remarks   Steve Fleischauer  

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W2  8:50 to 9 am  GTI update   Rob Witherspoon  

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W3  9 to 10 am  Best management practices for summer patch disease on annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.)   Melissa Bassoriello  Summer patch disease is managed primarily through preventative chemical applications in conjunction with cultural practices.  It should be noted, however, that the  appropriate method of pesticide application and the effects of various cultural practices on pathogen survival and disease development are not well know for annual bluegrass putting greens.  This presentation will describe field trials evaluating the efficiency of various fertility, fungicide  and cultural management practices. IPM 0.66

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W3    An ecological examination of lawn mixes and their interaction with fertility and irrigation.  Which lawn mix will work for each particular maintenance regime?   Katie Dodson  This session will focus primarily on species choices for home lawn mixes, and how the mixes perform under varying fertility and irrigation regimes.  We will be looking at how these two cultural practices, combined with varying species mixes, will promote turf growth over weed growth. IPM 0.66

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W4  10:30 to 11:15 am  Weed suppression in turf using different species and thicknesses of leaf mulch  and the National Turfgrass Evalution Program Organic Kentucky Bluegrass Trial   Erica Gunn and Peter Purvis  This session offers insight into a study that determined  the effectiveness of mulched leaves to control broadleaf weeds in lawn-type turf.  Leaves of six different tree species were collected, separately mulched and applied to weed infested turf located at the Guelph Turfgrass Institute. Commercially available bark mulch, compost, fertilizer and a broadleaf herbicide were also applied as separate treatments.  The effectiveness of leaf mulch on weed suppression and on  overall turf and soil health was evaluated.

 

The National Turfgrass Evalution Program Kentucky Bluegrass Trial is a low maintenance 'organic' trial located at the GTI.  Seeded in 2011, this trial  investigates 82 commercial and experimental Kentucky bluegrass cultivars grown using no synthetic pesticides or fertilizers and using no irrigation. IPM 1.0 

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W5  11:15 to noon  The impact of turf fertilization on water quality – A literature review   Dr. Christopher Murray  This presentation will provide an overview of a variety of scientific studies of the effect of turfgrass fertilization on the nutrient concentration in runoff and leachate. Special attention is paid to phosphorous and nitrogen, as these are the two macronutrients most commonly associated with damage to aquatic ecosystems. This presentation provides an overview of the means by which turfgrass may have a positive impact on water quality, and examines different recommended best management practices that minimize risk of contamination by excess applied fertilizer. IPM 0.5

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Sports Turf/ORFA Sessions          

W6  1:30 to 2 pm  Practical uses of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) for the sports turf manager   Dr. Ken Carey  Different sensors for turf canopy reflectance and their use in both turf management research and in practical situations will be discussed.  Canopy reflectance can be used to accurately and quickly quantify germination and cover development, nutrient status, phytotoxicity and other stress responses. IPM 0.66

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W7  2 to 2:30 pm  Turfgrass Water Conservation Alliance and its qualified turfgrass products   Russ Nicholson  Learn how particular cultivar selection, over just species selection, can provide  green turf while saving water.  Understand   how the research of the Turfgrass Water Conservation Alliance, along with cooperating universites, has quantitativley shown water savings. IPM 0.33 

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W8  2:30 to 3:30 pm  Winter stress is not just a turf problem   Gord Horsman  This session discusses the challanges City of Moncton workers faced when treating two sports fields for winter kill and preparing these fields (using grow tarps)  for international sporting events in a quick turn around time.

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Lawn Care          

W9  1:30 to 2 pm  Leatherjacket Bio-Control   Pam Charbonneau  Biocontrol experiments on leatherjackets were conducted in the field in fall 2011 and fall 2012.  Excellent results were achieved with a 50/50 combination of Steinernema feltiae and Heterhorabditis bacteriophora in 2011, between 50 and 70% control.  A smaller, more focused experiment was repeated in 2012 with this species combination to determine if the results were repeatable over the two different seasons. IPM 0.66

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W10  2 to 2:30 pm  Grubs and grass: An update on integrated turf management   Dr.  Michael Brownbridge  This presentation provides an update on research to develop new pest management tools  and resilient use practices to maintain the functionality  and appearance of lawn turf.  Information will include results from biopesticide trials against European chafer and chinch bug, and other potential components of sustainable integrated turf management programs. IPM 0.66

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W11  2:30 to 3:30 pm  Nailing the culprit:  Diagnosis of insect pest problems in turfgrass   Dr. Dan Peck  Absent of an accurate diagnosis of a pest problem, management efforts will fall short and IPM will fail.  Before any insect control actions can be taken it is important to correctly identify the insect(s) involved and determine "who" and 'what' the culprits are.  This session will address diagnosis of major insect pests of lawns, in particular, white grubs, chinch bugs and invasive crane flies.  Information will be summarized on their physical profile, behavioural profile, geographic distribution, habitat preferences, damage recognition, seasonal occurrence  and monitoring approaches. Types of evidence and how to gather, protect and intepret it will also be discussed. IPM 1.33

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Golf 

W12  1:30 to 2 pm  Weevil bedeviled:  Understanding annual bluegrass weevils in the golf course landscape   Dr. Dan Peck  The annual bluegrass weevil is a problem of increasing concern for golf course superintendents in eastern North America.  Detection, monitoring and decision making /intervention all depend on targeting the insect in space and time, or' when' and 'where' it occurs in the golf landscape.  This session addresses what happens at the insect's overwintering habitat, what happens at the insect's developmental habitat, what the relationship is between those diverging habitats and how this information can be exploited to improve IPM.  Best management practices for annual bluegrass weevil in Poa annua will be discussed. IPM 0.66 

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W13  2 to 2:30 pm  Bacterial blight:  What we know so far   Dr. Katerina Jordan  Superintendents in our area have been noting symptoms of chlorotic and etiolated creeping bentgrass turf in the past few years.  Recent research suggests that these symptoms may be the result of a bacterial infection with the pathogen Acidovorax avenae.  Very little is known, however, about the pathogenicity  and management of this pathogen. This talk will summarize and discuss some of the latest research on the disease with recommendations for superintendents who may experience declining creeping bentgrass in the heat of the summer. IPM 0.66

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W14  2:30 to 3:30 pm  Dollar spot review   Dr. Tom Hsiang  Dollar spot is the most prevalent turf disease of the Great Lakes region. Although it is not considered a difficult disease to deal with (as it can usually be brought under control after the first symptoms are observed) it has been found to be quite devastating if allowed to progress unchecked.  This presentation will examine some of the background of this disease and discuss some of the recent research on its biology and management. IPM 1.33

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Thursday, February 21, 2013

SportsTurf/ORFA

T1  9 to 10 am  Research and real world applications using crumb rubber to improve natural turf sports fields   Dr. Tim Vanini  Crumb rubber used for natural sports fields has been available  since the 1990's, however, it has been misunderstood as a helpful tool for sports field management.  This seminar will review the research and real world applications where crumb rubber has been effective for natural grass sports fields and how it can fit into a sports field management strategy. IPM 0.5

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T2  10 to 10:30 am  Overseeding species:  Best choices for success.   Katie Dodson  This session will  offer two overseeding species choices for Ontario.  There will also be discussion regarding the role of mowing height  and overseeding frequency when maintaining turfgrass coverage on pesticide-free athletic fields.  As well,  discussion on the effects of overseeding programs on the soil seedbank will be presented.  The session will conclude by looking at  how perennial ryegrass and supina bluegrass perform as overseeding species for in-use athletic fields. IPM 0.66

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T3  11 to 11:30 am  Impact of various field playing surfaces on sports turf injury rates   Dr. Eric Lyons, Dr. William Gage   

This session will describe the innovative methods and the results of a study to examine the effects of different surfaces on the biomechanics of running, cutting, and stopping maneuvers. Three different surfaces were used in this study: natural turfgrass, weedy, and synthetic. Motion-capture and force plate technologies were used to gather biomechanical measures of the different movements, and special focus was given to examination of differences in the variability of the movements.

 

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T4  11:30 to noon  Outdoor sports field strategy utilizing STA classification system and benchmarking   Beth Rajnovich  As the population for the City of Waterloo grows demands for outdoor sports fields is increasing.  A long term plan was needed to determine how to best meet the community's needs for sports fields in the coming years.  This presentation will explore how the City used the Sports Turf Association's Field Classification System as a starting point to identify how  existing field inventory was being used, where there was capacity to increase use and to project how many additional sports fields would be needed over the next 20 years.  Lessons learned from this process will be shared  as well as how to improve this process.

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Lawn Care

T5  9 to 9:30 am  Turfgrass Water Conservation Alliance  and its qualified   turfgrass products   Russ Nicholson  Learn how promoting a Turfgrass Water Conservation Alliance qualified cultivar is green.  Define your company as a steward of water conservation while providing green turfgrass. IPM 0.33

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T6  9:30 to 10 am  How do rhizomatous tall fescue and regenerative perennial ryegrass perform in Ontario? Year 1   Pam Charbonneau  A field experiment to examine various characteristics of irrigated and non-irrigated plots of endophytic rhizomatous tall fescue and endophytic regenerative perennial ryegrass against a standard home lawn mix was set up in the fall of 2011.  These plots were evaluated for broadleaf weed invasion, recuperation after drought and also for grub infestation.  The results for these two species are interesting and very promising for both resistance to weed invasion and grub infestation in Ontario where the cosmetic use of pesticides on home laws is prohibited. IPM 0.66

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T7  10 to 10:30 am  Which Kentucky bluegrass cultivars use less water?   Dr. Dale Bremer  In a two year study  irrigation applications ranged widely among 30 bluegrasses when using a wilt-based management strategy.  In a second study, plots were allowed to dry down for 60 to 88 days without irrigation, and then allowed to recover.  Kentucky bluegrass is underestimated when it comes to its potential for maintaining acceptable quality under reduced water inputs and for its ability to resist drought. IPM 0.66

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T8  11 to 11:30 am  Impact of turfgrass fertilization on nutrient losses through runoff and leaching   Guillaume Gregoire  This  session will compare the impact of three turfgrass fertility regimes based on real life scenarios for nutrient losses through runoff and leaching. Results from first year experiments indicate that leaching water volume is reduced by  the synthetic fertility regimes compared to other  treatments (natural, compost and unfertilized controls).  These results indicate that fertility regimes currently used by lawn care companies have a positive impact on both visual quality of turf and the environmental performances of turfgrass. IPM 0.66

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T9  11:30 to noon  Renovation techniques, overseeding and post-renovation practices that produce a quality lawn in a pesticide-free environment   Katie Dodson  This session will focus on managing home lawns with cultural practices.  There will be discussion on how to renovate a weedy home lawn without the use of pesticides as well as the best  timing  for the renovation.  The session will also look at what role post-renovation cultivation practices, combined with and without overseeding, can be used to keep weed populations down, while maintaining a quality home lawn. IPM 0.66

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Golf        

T10  9 to 9:30 am  IPM Council of Canada update –on-site audits, new policies and procedures   Teri Yamada or a member of the IPM Council of Canada Board of Directors  This session will discuss the changes to the on-site audits, discuss the new policies and procedures for the Integrated Pest Management Accreditation Program as well as the revised CEC requirements and timing for 2012/2013. IPM 0.66

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T11  9:30 to 10 am  Annual report and public meeting requirements   Violet Van Wassenaer  This session offers a review of the proper completion of the golf course annual report form and the notification  requirements for the public meeting as required by the Pesticides Act and Ontario Regulation 63/09. IPM 0.66

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T12  10 to 10:30 am  Philosophy of golf course management:  Europe vs North America   Dr. Eric Lyons  Differing regulations regarding pesticides  and other agricultural products have resulted in different views pertaining to the final goal of golf course superintendents in Europe and North America.  The North American superintendent  has much to learn from his/her colleagues across the Atlantic in communciating  the intent of management and what the true impact of fewer pesticides will be on the game for end users. There are vastly different viewpoints about disease management  and the use of a more holistic approach to the plant community in golf environments. IPM 0.66

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T13  11 to 11:30 am  I have this new tool - how do I use it?  Understanding the power of a Time Domain Reflectrometry probe   Doug Erwin  This session will describe the use and integration of TDR meters into overall golf course maintenance programs. Data obtained from  these meters is correlated with weather data to help guage the performance of soil profiles.  This data can also be used to assist with scheduling irriagtion as well as other water use strategies leading to  water conservation.  Topdressing , aerating  and fungacide application strategies are also impacted  by watering programs. IPM 0.66

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T14  11:30 to noon  Sensitivity to DMI fungicides 20 years after first use   Anne-Miet Van Den nieuwelaar  The first DMI fungicide on turf, propiconazole, was registered in Canada in 1994. Before its first use, hundreds of isolates of the dollar spot fungus from several golf courses across Southern Ontario were collected and tested for their sensitivity to DMI fungicides. Ten year later a follow-up study was done at the same courses to determine whether the use of DMI fungicides during the first ten years had altered the fungicide sensitivity of the dollar spot fungus. A further study will be conducted in 2013 to 2014 to examine populations of the dollar fungus  for possible shifts in fungicide sensitivity. This presentation will cover these past studies, their results and implications for turf management and provide basic information on fungicide resistance. IPM 0.66

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Sod Growers          

T15  9 to 9:30 am  Background and justification for installation of artificial fields at the University of Guelph   Bill Clausen  Why is the University of Guelph building artificial turf fields?  Students and clients demand safe, playable sports surfaces even with over 50 hours of use weekly from mid August until mid November. It is difficult for the University grounds department  to renovate and maintain high quality turf for recreation.  Sports field staff cannot effectively schedule use on  the fields in the spring and summer months to allow the grounds department time to rejuvenate them. This causes conflict with  students and the greater Guelph community who want fields to be open for their use and  in good playing condition.

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T16  9:30 to 10:30  Recognition  and cultural management of common diseases of sod   Dr. Tom Hsiang  Sod differs from other turfgrass in that it is usually exposed to much less wear stress and is grown under higher fertility conditions.This type of turf has disease problems that may be different from that as found on sports fields or lawns.  This session will focus on some major problems of turfgrass grown for sod such as rusts, necrotic ring spot, leaf spots and winter damage.  This presentation will also report on recent research regarding  the biology and management of these diseases with an emphasis on cultural controls. IPM 1.33

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T17  11 to 11:30 am  Turfgrass Water Conservation Alliance  and its qualified turfgrass products   Russ Nicholson  This session shows how to promote green turfgrass and save water to achieve LEED credits.  Learn how the research of the Turfgrass Water Conservation Alliance, along with cooperating universities, has quantitativley shown water savings.

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T18  11:30 to noon  Which Kentucky bluegrass cultivars use less water?   Dr. Dale Bremer 

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General Sessions          

T19  1:30 to 3 pm  Drought dialogue:  How can we, as Turf Managers, provide more drought tolerant turf surfaces for the future?   Municipal representative, seed company representative, sod grower, Dr. Dale Bremer and Russ Nicholson  Participants in this dialogue will discuss a range of perspectives from researchers, seed companies, sod growers, landscape architects and municipalities.  This is a joint session with the Nursery Sod Growers Association

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T20  1:30 to 3 pm  Incidents and Accidents Record Keeping: The Does and Don’ts.   Terry Piche  From blisters, broken bones to lost limbs – the difference between reporting events involving workers, users or guests continues to be blurred! The ORFA partners with key players in the legal/litigation sector to best understand how today’s recreation practitioner needs to be best prepared when such events occur! When is a Form 1000 to be used? How do your current internal report forms measure up when placed against other operations? Do you have all the key agencies identified and their forms handy for reporting purposes? How can reports cross reference between no fault insurance and civil liability? All are good questions that need good answers.

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T21  1:30 to 3 pm  Turf in the lab   Dr. Katerina Jordan,  Linda Jewell, Dr. Ken Carey and Shahram Sharififar  This presentation will consist of  hands-on experiences.  Attendees will have the opportunity to examine live cultures of pathogens, examine pathogens under the microscope to learn key features for identification and learn about the use of DNA sequencing technology for pathogen identification. Other stations will examine soil texture, measure soil pH and  look at insect parasitic nematodes to describe if they are healthy and viable.  A time domain reflectrometry probe will be demonstrated to ensure its  correct use.  The turf diagnostic process will also be reviewed using live turf samples. IPM 2.0

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OTS PARTNER ASSOCIATIONS

Guelph Turfgrass Institute Nursery Sod Growers Association of Ontario Professional Lawn Care Association of Ontario Ontario Recreation Facilities Association Ontario Turfgrass Research Foundation Sports Turf Association

OTS 2016 SPONSORS

Turf Care Plant Products MAR-CO
Simplistic Lines Inc. Ontario Seed Company Nutrite
Fiesta Lawn Life Bannerman
G.C. Duke Dol Turf Hutcheson
Vissers Nursery & Sod Farm